Physical sunscreen

Walgreens Baby SPF 50 Sunscreen review

This drugstore-brand sunscreen is very thick, pasty, and may not be the most stable formula. Plus, how it compares to NO-AD Naturals Clear Mineral Formula SPF 50.

I love a good deal, but if you buy something that you’re not going to use, it’s no longer a good deal—it’s just a penny saved, a penny wasted. This is exactly the sinking thought that came to mind when I finally tried out that bottle of Walgreens Baby SPF 50 Sunscreen I bought on clearance a while ago. I’m writing this review in hopes of saving others from the same fate: If you see this sunscreen at your local drugstore, save yourself a few bucks and…just.…

Neutrogena Pure and Free Baby Sunscreen Stick review

This SPF 60+ stick is for babies, but great for all ages. Plus, it doesn't contain potentially comedogenic ingredients like many other sticks.

In theory, sunscreen sticks sound like a great product. They’re easy to apply and you can throw ‘em in your handbag without worrying about potential spillage. But after scouring various product pages, I realized that many mineral/physical sunscreen sticks aren’t designed with acne-prone people in mind. Many of them contain at least one of the ingredients on Acne.org’s list of comedogenic ingredients to avoid—typically cocoa butter and/or coconut oil. Let me show you a few…

Bare Republic Tinted Face Sunscreen SPF 30 review

This sunscreen is the tinted version of Bare Republic's regular facial sunscreen, and contains the same trio of antioxidant-rich oils: grape seed, carrot seed, and raspberry seed.

Remember those heavily discounted Bare Republic sunscreens I saw at Duane Reade (my local drugstore) a few months ago? I went back about a week after I first bought those and they were completely gone…replaced by Christmas merchandise. At least I had the chance to snag more than one bottle that day, including Bare Republic Tinted Facial Mineral Sunscreen SPF 30.